The Stork Mis-Delivered – Twice – Abuse Survivor

Stork

 

Mistie Jolin dreams of a future like the ones she has read about in books. Her past won’t get her there. Only escape will.
College goes downhill when she realizes health care isn’t available to students with real medical needs.
The army is her last hope. Once there, she is pulled back into a past better buried, to uncover secrets she never dreamed existed.
Secrets that will haunt her, and hundreds more till they die. Mistie must face her fears, the past, and those she has come to trust. Her hope is that they will allow her to recover, and become a real person, rather than the shadow that creeps on the wall and follows her every move.

The Stork Mis-Delivered – Twice is a tale that could have happened. Many aspects have happened to many young girls, women, and even men. This is a violent tale. One that looks at the generational damage caused by abuse, neglect, and pain. There is no easy answer as to why survivors do not escape. Most have been conditioned since childhood to believe the abuse is normal. Or, they hope by bearing the abuse themselves, it prevents others from being abused. Often, survivors have nowhere safe to go. Or financial resources to reach a safe place. Laws bind children to their abuser. If they do escape, abusers follow, and bring them back into the endless cycle.
While any of these events could have occurred, this tale is not based on any real life, or combination of lives.

Rating: R.
Profanity: Obvious, unprinted.
Romance: None.
Sex: Off the page. Acknowledged. Violent acts acknowledged as well.
Violence: Alluded to. Court case that covers child sex abuse victims.
Originally written: 2010.

POV Characters: Mistie Jolin
Length: 80,000 words

Amazon (ASIN: B06WVBZVQB) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06WVBZVQB

Amazon Print: https://www.amazon.com/Stork-Mis-Delivered-Twice-April-Brown/dp/1974309622 and https://www.amazon.com/Stork-Mis-Delivered-Twice-April-Brown/dp/1974309614/

Apple I books (1270998922) http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1270998922

Barnes Noble Nook https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-stork-mis-delivered-twice-april-d-brown/1125887511

Bookshare https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1489630

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34305975-the-stork-mis-delivered—twice

Kobo (1230001546507 ) https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-stork-mis-delivered-twice

Smashwords (co-publishes at): (9781370698851) https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/704039

Soon to be available on Google Play!

#Abusesurvival, #dysfunctionalfamilies, #religiousabuse, #abusesurvivorlaw, #abusesurvivorrecovery, #co-dependency, #self-esteem, #BodyLanguage&NonverbalCommunication, #PTSD, #crime, #legalsystem, #domesticviolence

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Women’s History Month – Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson

Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson (1912 – 2007) lived a very full life, and cannot be summed up easily in 250 words.  She believed in, and fought for equal rights and opportunities for all, regardless of gender or ethnicity.
She went to college to be a journalist, and then married the political Lyndon B. Johnson.  She pushed him to continue his political career.
Perhaps, she saw this as the best way to help women and ethnic groups.  Within politics, a whisper and whisper there could lead to change.
While her husband was president, he signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  This act outlawed discrimination based on race.  She encouraged him to face those who were angry at him for passing this law.  He traveled the country, and spoke to those who would spit on him for daring to think people of various ethnicities had the same rights as he did.
She also created and helped run the Head Start program.  While the program isn’t perfect, none can be, it does help many disadvantaged students who would be dumped into a daycare while both parents work to provide food, clothing, and housing.  These students get a chance to learn the beginning of life skills their parents do not have time to teach them.  It has changed focus over the years to more of a disability equalizer program.
Besides helping others, she lived up to her name by helping the environment through the Highway Beautification Act of 1965.  Her work encouraged preserving the California Redwoods, rather than cutting them all down and turning them into furniture.  She served on the National Park board, wrote about the parks. She also founded the National Wildlife Research Center in Austin, Texas.

Let us hope all the work she did will continue to advance and equalize the country.  May it never be undone.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

https://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/lady-bird-johnson/

http://www.pbs.org/ladybird/politicalwife/politicalwife_index.html

Women’s History Month – Ellen Swallow Richards

Ellen Swallow Richards (1842 – 1911) Was a female trailblazer.  She fought for the right for women to obtain degrees in their desired fields.  She wanted to be a chemist.  However, women were not allowed to at this time.
Perhaps, this a protective endeavor, to prevent women from being poisoned by chemicals.  For young adults, recommending returning after parenting would be understandable.  However, the outright refusal is not a good idea.  It will prevent many breakthroughs.  It is an issue of understanding the consequences of working in such and environment.
Well before the EPA was introduced, she encouraged and worked on stream water analysis.  At the time, some pollutants were not tested for, or the tests were not as accurate as they might be today.
What would she think of today’s streams full of pesticides, herbicides, and processed medications?
Without the degree, Ellen Swallow Richards continued her studies on her own.  She developed sewage treatment options, which have saved millions of lives over the years.
She fought for healthy nutrition, at a time when the industrial revolution was taking off and filling the skies with pollutants.  She recognized the dangers of arsenic in wallpaper and clothing, at time when other scientists assured the public it was safe.
Her work in the scientific community helped women reach for a future that had been denied them for so long.  Without her work, we’d have reddish grey skies, and toxic, garbage filled waterways.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

https://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/ellen-swallow-richards/

http://www.biography.com/people/ellen-richards-9457351

Women’s History Month – Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson (1907 – 1964) was a biologist, ecologist, and writer.  In 1936, she was a pioneer for women, as one of the two who worked in US Bureau of Fisheries. Her interests concerned the both the livelihood of the fisherman, as well as conserving the fish population for future generations.  She wrote many books and smaller items on sustainable fishing practices.
Her book, Silent Spring, in 1962, focused on other living creatures, primarily birds, and how they were going extinct due to pollution, fertilizers, and pesticides.  As a direct result of her work, DDT was banned.  Two years later, she died of breast cancer, likely brought on by her work and research into DDT.
Thanks to her research, the EPA was created in 1970 to help locate dangers, and protect the community from pesticides and other chemicals that alter human DNA, cause illness, and potential early death.  By protecting humans, we also protect the environment.  Rachel Carson gave her life to protect the lives of all future women.

May her work not be in vain.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

http://www.biography.com/people/rachel-carson-9239741#!

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/rachel_carson/about/rachelcarson.html

Snowflake versus Grasshopper

Snowflakes. Sweet gentle, delicate, lacy things. No two are identical.

They value diversity. They clump together to create intricate designs. As they slip and slide from the sky, they reach out to help one another. To lift each other up. Occasionally, one flake may lose a piece of itself while helping another. They join, and rejoin to create beauty in the eyes of people who are alive.
Children lick the snowflakes from the sky with pure delight. They sled and play in them.
Adults, those who are living and breathing with nature, enjoy their beauty from afar. They sip hot coffee, or hot chocolate, from the warmth of a fire. They know, the more snow, the more flowers spring will bring.
Adults who ignore nature, or see it as beast to be tamed, fret, argue, and scream at snow, as they beat it into water, slosh it way, and drive over it, abandoning their family time for isolated buildings far away.
Occasionally, the wind will roar. Snow will form a blizzard. It will cover everything. While it may look on the surface as if it is a uniform texture and coverage, it rarely is. It has humps, bumps, hills, dales, valleys, and even gentle streams lurking underneath.
When it melts away in spring, the beauty revealed makes all want to enjoy it. Streams and rivers form.  The ground is softened, ready to grow. Farmers know deep snows will bring forth abundant crops. Many regions depend on the deep snows for drinking and irrigation water.

Without the blizzards, droughts haunt the breadbasket of our country.

Like snowflakes, grasshoppers are pretty and fun for children to chase. When they occur a few at a time. Most are harmless. They simply eat a little grass and grain, and become the snacks of spiders and birds.
Once, our nation was covered in these tiny creatures. Now, they are rare.
Like snowflakes, grasshoppers can create storms on the wind, called locust swarms. Although locust swarms were once common in the US, they have been gone for almost 100 years.
When grasshoppers combine to swarm, they don’t do so to lift each other up. They gorge. They become larger. More extreme. Identical. Giant grasshoppers, all teeth and stomach. They fly together. They eat everything in sight. They are so ravenous, their tiny jaws will bite the flesh of human and animals as they engulf crops, grass, leaves, and any green thing in their path.
They leave destruction and death in their wake. Destroyed crops may extend for hundreds of miles in either direction. Before the days of the engine, entire villages would be wiped out, as grasshoppers ate the crops the people and animals depended on for winter.
However, unlike snowflakes who build each other up, locusts tear each other down. They abandon their weak, their wounded, the legless, and the wingless, to die a miserable death eating the last few hidden bits of grain in a location they devastated.
Not only that, locusts lay eggs in the millions that will hatch and eat next year’s crop as it rises out of the ground. It may take decades for a region to recover it’s flora and fauna from a locust storm.

Are you a snowflake lifting others up? Valuing and creating more diversity? Creating beauty in the now, and furthering life after you melt in the warmth of spring?

Or a locust, eating everything in sight, and leaving the once fertile fields barren of life?

Scientific Method

Science is a major topic these days.
I’ll start with a dream conversation from a few nights ago.
We all actively participate in science every single day. Every breath, every movement, every cell growth and regeneration is part of science.

We all do chemistry every single day. We eat, digest food and drink, and eliminate waste from our bodies. At least some of the waste. Other bits remain stuck in our cells, and can cause hormone imbalances, or genetic mutation.

The Scientific Method is simple. One we all do from the moment we are born, if not before. Every child has natural scientific curiosity. and employs this process without being taught how to.
Step 1: Ask a question. Any question.
Step 2: Form a hypothesis – which is a fancy way of saying – make a prediction.
Step 3: Conduct an experiment. Babies do this. They cry – and learn what the results will be for those cries.
Step 4: Gather the data and analyze it. In most people, this is done internally, and almost instantly. Scientists will do this on paper multiple times.
Step 5: Reach a conclusion.
Step 6: Repeat as needed, changing variables, while keeping one aspect constant.

Part one of this discussion: Can scientists make mistakes?
Certainly. they are human. Their biases can impact any step of the process. As can unknown, and unexpected factors such as air, water, container quality. Other biases, such as religion, politics, age, gender, and known knowledge also affect each step of the process.
Part two of this discussion: Have scientists recently made mistakes?
Certainly. However, media is a big part of the problem. When they began playing mocumentaries as documentaries, they seriously damaged the scientific community. The stations that played these also damaged their reputation.
The next big question: Is climate change real? Yes. The climate always changes. Always has. Always will.

Are humans impacting it? Without a doubt.
How scientists have shot themselves in the foot, and made every claim they ever made unreliable: Insisting every single month is the hottest month ever.
Mathematically, that isn’t possible. Most people know this. One summer, three or four years ago was turning point. In August, we had 29 days where the temperature did not reach to within 10 degrees of average. It was cold. Jackets in August. The last two days of the month, the temperature reached average. And one single degree above.
Even the most mathematically challenged recognized that there was no way that was the hottest August ever.

Are what scientists calling for to combat man induced climate change reasonable?
Certainly. Solar power, clean water, Community based lifestyles. Little to no driving. Fresh food. Family life again, instead of none, as most people have.
Scientists make mistakes. They sometimes overgeneralize in order to make a greater savings for later. Better to do so, than to regret not making a change at a later time, or a later generation.

We need to encourage science. To develop solutions to the work-a-holic lifestyle, energy that doesn’t demand nonrenewable resources from the planet. Or even overuse of renewable resources. There is much that can be done.
There is much that must be done. Science is the way forward.

Pacific Garbage Patch

When I’m stressed, I sing. I’ve been doing that a lot lately. I need to quit creating songs.
One aspect that is lightly mentioned in my novels, and would make a good follow up short story if I ever have time – the trip to the Pacific Garbage Patch.
We really need our teens to work on this. Teens – because they have the brain power, the energy, the strength to do the work. They haven’t been told no too many times. They haven’t accepted the death of the planet as inevitable in the next few decades. They don’t want to race to that moment. They want to live to see adulthood.
We need them to create ways to collect the garbage patches. We need them to clean up the mess their parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, and great-great-grandparents made.
Then, we need to know if the plastic eating bacteria are safe. What happens when they encounter batteries in the garbage for instance?
We don’t want to create a bigger problem.
Or, like some Northern European countries, we need to turn those plastics back into fuel.
Our planet cannot exist without living oceans.
If all the animals die – through over hunting and eating plastic instead of food, the currents will slow. The tides will change. The weather patterns will falter.
We need living oceans.
We need living creatures.
We don’t want to be the cause of the only living things on Earth being bacteria and viruses.
We need science oriented teens to lead the way to save our planet.
We might not live long enough to see sustainable oceans. They might. Teens are our hope for a future. One we won’t see.
One they, and the children of today deserve. They deserve a chance to live. And at least a tenth of the resources of those who lived in the last century.
Give them a chance to save the Earth for themselves, and their future.