National Week of the Ocean

The first week of April is the National Week of the Ocean.

A perfect time to think about the ocean.  Not just the beaches.  Though they do matter.  The beaches are like the leaves of the ocean. They stretch out to join ocean and Earth.  Ocean and sky.  We see the health of the ocean through its natural beaches.  Those less travelled by humans.

Oceans were once teeming with life.  Now, many sections are left barren by overfishing.  Empty places, with little, or nothing to fill them.

Beaches show this by their lack of living, mostly mammals and crustaceans, who once lived on the beaches, the border between the land and the sea.

Oceans are now filled with debris.  Much plastic, and other garbage, that floated into them from the mountains, down the once pristine streams, to glutted rivers, and deposited in the ocean. Animals eat this plastic, thinking it is food.  Or, in the case of filter feeders, there is no escaping as they open their mouths to eat.  In many ways, plastic in the oceans, is like smoke in smoke-filled room.  No escaping it.  It is in your clothes, lungs, food, drink, hair, and everything there.

We see the devastation on many beaches. Covered with garbage, brought in by the waves.  Garbage that did not originate on that coast, or even that continent.

Europeans are doing their part to enact laws to cut back plastics use, and help clean up oceans, regardless of where the trash in them came from.

Our beaches show us the life and death struggle of the animals that live both in the depths, and those that live on land.

Once, the beaches teemed with life.  Both ocean life, and terrestrial life.  Sleeping, feeding, and raising families.  Now, many are lifeless, empty, eroding without the animals to keep them safe from harm.

Ocean Garbage : https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2018/03/22/great-pacific-garbage-patch-grows/446405002/

Ocean Cleanup:  https://www.theoceancleanup.com/

Ocean Cleanup on Beaches where the garbage did not originate.  People drink this water.  Fish from it.  Bathe in it.  https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/aug/09/modern-life-rubbish-helping-mumbai-clean-up-beach-india-city

It doesn’t have to be this way.  There are plenty of teens inventing solutions to collect the garbage from the oceans.  As much as possible.  Of course, millions of jobs could be created.  Governments choose not to, as they’ve no place to put all the garbage.  Though, it could be sorted, recycled, and broken down into less dangerous particles.

Garbage Bin: http://www.slate.com/articles/video/video/2015/12/a_clever_new_automatic_ocean_trash_collection_system_called_the_seabin_is.html

A list of options: https://upliftconnect.com/clean-up-the-ocean/

There are dangers to fish being trapped inside the garbage collection devices.  And most of the choices will not collect microplastics, especially microplastic beads. Which tend to fill plankton, that are eaten by larger fish, and larger fish, up three or four sizes before being eaten by humans.

Microplastics https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/microplastics.html

Another option is bacteria that digest plastic.  They could eventually help clean up our oceans, and our landfills.  https://phys.org/news/2016-03-newly-bacteria-plastic-bottles.html Again, creating millions of jobs to grow the bacteria, disperse, it, and evaluate the landfills as they shrink from plastic disappearing.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to see the ocean, and its beaches teeming with life, rather than litter?

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The Stork Mis-Delivered – Twice – Abuse Survivor

Stork

 

Mistie Jolin dreams of a future like the ones she has read about in books. Her past won’t get her there. Only escape will.
College goes downhill when she realizes health care isn’t available to students with real medical needs.
The army is her last hope. Once there, she is pulled back into a past better buried, to uncover secrets she never dreamed existed.
Secrets that will haunt her, and hundreds more till they die. Mistie must face her fears, the past, and those she has come to trust. Her hope is that they will allow her to recover, and become a real person, rather than the shadow that creeps on the wall and follows her every move.

The Stork Mis-Delivered – Twice is a tale that could have happened. Many aspects have happened to many young girls, women, and even men. This is a violent tale. One that looks at the generational damage caused by abuse, neglect, and pain. There is no easy answer as to why survivors do not escape. Most have been conditioned since childhood to believe the abuse is normal. Or, they hope by bearing the abuse themselves, it prevents others from being abused. Often, survivors have nowhere safe to go. Or financial resources to reach a safe place. Laws bind children to their abuser. If they do escape, abusers follow, and bring them back into the endless cycle.
While any of these events could have occurred, this tale is not based on any real life, or combination of lives.

Rating: R.
Profanity: Obvious, unprinted.
Romance: None.
Sex: Off the page. Acknowledged. Violent acts acknowledged as well.
Violence: Alluded to. Court case that covers child sex abuse victims.
Originally written: 2010.

POV Characters: Mistie Jolin
Length: 80,000 words

Amazon (ASIN: B06WVBZVQB) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06WVBZVQB

Amazon Print: https://www.amazon.com/Stork-Mis-Delivered-Twice-April-Brown/dp/1974309622 and https://www.amazon.com/Stork-Mis-Delivered-Twice-April-Brown/dp/1974309614/

Apple I books (1270998922) http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1270998922

Barnes Noble Nook https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-stork-mis-delivered-twice-april-d-brown/1125887511

Bookshare https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1489630

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34305975-the-stork-mis-delivered—twice

Kobo (1230001546507 ) https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-stork-mis-delivered-twice

Smashwords (co-publishes at): (9781370698851) https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/704039

Soon to be available on Google Play!

#Abusesurvival, #dysfunctionalfamilies, #religiousabuse, #abusesurvivorlaw, #abusesurvivorrecovery, #co-dependency, #self-esteem, #BodyLanguage&NonverbalCommunication, #PTSD, #crime, #legalsystem, #domesticviolence

Bending the Bars – Abuse Survival

Bending the Bars

 

Book Title: Bending the Bars
Genre: Abuse Survival
Age: Adult

Anne’s story need never be documented.
If existing law had protected Anne, and Ruby’s children, Ruby’s Law would never have been written.
Jo and Lennie begin a 20 year trek to find and rescue Anne from her abusive husband.
They rescue hundreds of other women, children, and the occasional man.
Often, the survivors have known no other life.
They have been conditioned to believe abuse is normal.
The search for Anne continues. Their hope begins to fade.
Bodies burn out.
More stations open.
More people try to escape. Stuck in the legal limbo land, where they are safe from abusers, while surrounded by other survivors, with little hope of full recovery. Few make it out to live beyond the bars that Ruby’s Law has given to protect them. It simply isn’t safe. Abusers wait out there. Often barely beyond the fence.
Can the New Underground Railroad Project stay on track to train abuse survivors to live abuse-free on their own?
Or will they remain behind the legal bars that protect them from their abusers?

Other notes:

Bending the Bars is a journey though recognition of abusers, and survivors in the United States. It recognizes how the laws protect the abusers at the expense of the abused. It also conveys reasons why so many stay when they are abused. They often feel there is no escape. Often, there isn’t. If they have children, they have to leave without them, potentially condemning their children to worse than if they stay. Legally. It shouldn’t be that way. Ruby’s Law is a weak start to grant safety to survivors, and a place to bend the bars of abuse, without breaking the survivors.

Author’s Note:
Book Title: Bending the Bars
Genre: Abuse Survival
Age: Adult
Rating: PG 16
Profanity: None
Romance: In passing.
Sex: Mentioned.
Violence: Some. Car chases, shootings, survivors of abuse

POV Characters: Jo Forester, Lennie Darendale
Length: 80,000 words

Apple I books http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1270997398

Barnes Noble Nook https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/bending-the-bars-april-d-brown/1125892483

Bookshare https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1489631

Kobo (1230001546293 ) https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/bending-the-bars-1

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34304993-bending-the-bars

Soon to be on Google Play!

#Abusesurvival, #dysfunctionalfamilies, #religiousabuse, #abusesurvivorlaw, #abusesurvivorrecovery, #co-dependency, #self-esteem, #BodyLanguage&NonverbalCommunication, #PTSD, #crime, #legalsystem, #domesticviolence

Women’s History Month – Sacagawea

Sacagawea (1788 – 1812) is well known to most school children as the woman who smoothed the way for the men of the Lewis and Clark expedition across the frontier of America before paved roads, cars, planes, TVs, or phones existed.
Many facts about Sacagawea are lost in the mists of myth.  Her early years are partially documented.  She was born to a Shoshone tribe.  And kidnapped as a child by a Hidatsa tribe.  This tribe traded, or sold her to a French trapper, Toussaint Charbonneau, as a “wife.”  He was asked to join the Lewis and Clark expedition.  Sacagawea joined them, even though they would walk much of the way, and she was pregnant.  The Journey lasted from May 1804 to September 1806.
After her son was born, she continued the trek, and carried him along.  She was able to met with her long lost brother at a critical moment in the journey.  If she hadn’t met him, the team would have been killed.  In many other ways, she saved them, through languages they did now speak, medical care, cooking, and reminding them of why they took the journey.
After the trek was over, her history starts to get murky with mists.
According to most sources, she gave birth to a daughter in 1812 and died.  William Clark then adopted her two children, although the man who is supposed to be her husband, is still alive for nearly 30 more years.
There is also another documented story, that claims she survived and left to marry a Comanche and lived to be over 100 years old.
She was a true pioneer for women’s right’s to make their own decisions, and did what she could to teach others to treat women with respect.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

http://www.sacagaweafacts.net/

http://www.pbs.org/lewisandclark/inside/saca.html

Women’s History Month – Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson

Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson (1912 – 2007) lived a very full life, and cannot be summed up easily in 250 words.  She believed in, and fought for equal rights and opportunities for all, regardless of gender or ethnicity.
She went to college to be a journalist, and then married the political Lyndon B. Johnson.  She pushed him to continue his political career.
Perhaps, she saw this as the best way to help women and ethnic groups.  Within politics, a whisper and whisper there could lead to change.
While her husband was president, he signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  This act outlawed discrimination based on race.  She encouraged him to face those who were angry at him for passing this law.  He traveled the country, and spoke to those who would spit on him for daring to think people of various ethnicities had the same rights as he did.
She also created and helped run the Head Start program.  While the program isn’t perfect, none can be, it does help many disadvantaged students who would be dumped into a daycare while both parents work to provide food, clothing, and housing.  These students get a chance to learn the beginning of life skills their parents do not have time to teach them.  It has changed focus over the years to more of a disability equalizer program.
Besides helping others, she lived up to her name by helping the environment through the Highway Beautification Act of 1965.  Her work encouraged preserving the California Redwoods, rather than cutting them all down and turning them into furniture.  She served on the National Park board, wrote about the parks. She also founded the National Wildlife Research Center in Austin, Texas.

Let us hope all the work she did will continue to advance and equalize the country.  May it never be undone.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

https://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/lady-bird-johnson/

http://www.pbs.org/ladybird/politicalwife/politicalwife_index.html

Women’s History Month – Ellen Swallow Richards

Ellen Swallow Richards (1842 – 1911) Was a female trailblazer.  She fought for the right for women to obtain degrees in their desired fields.  She wanted to be a chemist.  However, women were not allowed to at this time.
Perhaps, this a protective endeavor, to prevent women from being poisoned by chemicals.  For young adults, recommending returning after parenting would be understandable.  However, the outright refusal is not a good idea.  It will prevent many breakthroughs.  It is an issue of understanding the consequences of working in such and environment.
Well before the EPA was introduced, she encouraged and worked on stream water analysis.  At the time, some pollutants were not tested for, or the tests were not as accurate as they might be today.
What would she think of today’s streams full of pesticides, herbicides, and processed medications?
Without the degree, Ellen Swallow Richards continued her studies on her own.  She developed sewage treatment options, which have saved millions of lives over the years.
She fought for healthy nutrition, at a time when the industrial revolution was taking off and filling the skies with pollutants.  She recognized the dangers of arsenic in wallpaper and clothing, at time when other scientists assured the public it was safe.
Her work in the scientific community helped women reach for a future that had been denied them for so long.  Without her work, we’d have reddish grey skies, and toxic, garbage filled waterways.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

https://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/ellen-swallow-richards/

http://www.biography.com/people/ellen-richards-9457351

Women’s History Month – Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson (1907 – 1964) was a biologist, ecologist, and writer.  In 1936, she was a pioneer for women, as one of the two who worked in US Bureau of Fisheries. Her interests concerned the both the livelihood of the fisherman, as well as conserving the fish population for future generations.  She wrote many books and smaller items on sustainable fishing practices.
Her book, Silent Spring, in 1962, focused on other living creatures, primarily birds, and how they were going extinct due to pollution, fertilizers, and pesticides.  As a direct result of her work, DDT was banned.  Two years later, she died of breast cancer, likely brought on by her work and research into DDT.
Thanks to her research, the EPA was created in 1970 to help locate dangers, and protect the community from pesticides and other chemicals that alter human DNA, cause illness, and potential early death.  By protecting humans, we also protect the environment.  Rachel Carson gave her life to protect the lives of all future women.

May her work not be in vain.

Works Cited: All Accessed on 02/23/17

http://www.biography.com/people/rachel-carson-9239741#!

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/rachel_carson/about/rachelcarson.html